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Augustine: “its meaning grows with them”

29 August 2014

Augustine of Hippo

“The Bible was composed in such a way that as beginners mature, its meaning grows with them.”

- Augustine of Hippo, Confessions

Bishop Charles Grafton: “divided like the waves thus superficially, but they are one as the ocean is one”

27 August 2014

Charles Grafton

“The Catholic [Anglican, not the Roman] Church, to which we belong, stands for collectivism [as opposed to Protestant "individualism" and Roman Catholic "imperialism"]. It has a broad, and yet liberal, basis for its belief. This belief rests in the invulnerable basis of Catholic consent. What has not been so certified, we regard as matters of private opinion. The Church is thus at once conservative and liberal. Her comprehensiveness is shown in her allowing of different schools of theological thought. The high, low, and broad Churchmen, though differing from one another in expression of their faith, are, nevertheless, bound together in unity by the government of the Church, the Sacraments, and the Book of Common Prayer. They are divided like the waves thus superficially, but they are one as the ocean is one.”
– +Charles Grafton, 2nd Bishop of Fond du Lac (Wisconsin)

Aldous Huxley: “As political and economic freedom diminishes, sexual freedom tends compensatingly to increase.”

23 August 2014

Aldous Huxley

“In a few years, no doubt, marriage licenses will be sold like dog licenses, good for a period of twelve months, with no law against changing dogs or keeping more than one animal at a time. As political and economic freedom diminishes, sexual freedom tends compensatingly to increase. And the dictator (unless he needs cannon fodder and families with which to colonize empty or conquered territories) will do well to encourage that freedom. In conjunction with the freedom to daydream under the influence of dope and movies and the radio, it will help to reconcile his subjects to the servitude which is their fate.”

- Aldous Huxley, in the foreword to his book”Brave New World”

Ask an Anglican: Why Enter (or Remain in) the Episcopal Church (USA)?

22 August 2014

Θεόφιλος:

Some good thoughts here. If you are, like me, an Episcopalian who struggles with the infidelities of TEC it is well worth the time to read.

Originally posted on The Conciliar Anglican:

William writes:

Might you have some encouraging words for someone who is recently converted to Anglicanism / Episcopalianism—who does not want to join ACNA, AMiA, or, for example, the Reformed Episcopal Church—who wants to enter TEC but is frightened because of its current, tragic state?

This is an incredibly distressing time to enter TEC. If I don’t get some encouragement soon, I just may pass altogether. I could merely hold my beliefs but worship elsewhere.

Christ came to save sinners (see Mark 2:17 and 1 Tim. 1:15).

Christ came to save sinners (see Mark 2:17 and 1 Tim. 1:15).

I rarely respond to questions by beginning with my own personal experience. My reason for this is simple: theology should consist of deduction from first principles—and autobiography is not and cannot be a first principle. I don’t wish to deny the importance of subjective hopes, fears, desires, etc. In truth, these have a very important place in human life and thus in Christian…

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Diodore of Tarsus: “the penalties to be inflicted for their many and grave sins are very far surpassed by the magnitude of the mercy to be showed to them”

22 August 2014

diodours

“For the wicked there are punishments, not perpetural, however, lest the immortality prepared for them should be a disadvantage, but they are to be purified for a brief period according to the amount of malice in their works. They shall therefore suffer punishment for a short space, but immortal blessedness having no end awaits them…the penalties to be inflicted for their many and grave sins are very far surpassed by the magnitude of the mercy to be showed to them.”

– Diodore of Tarsus

John Climacus: “the judgment of God is hidden from men”

20 August 2014

John Climacus

“Fire and water do not mix, neither can you mix judgment of others with the desire to repent. If a man commits a sin before you at the very moment of his death, pass no judgment, because the judgment of God is hidden from men. It has happened that men have sinned greatly in the open but have done greater deeds in secret, so that those who would disparage them have been fooled, with smoke instead of sunlight in their eyes.”

—St. John Climacus

Makarios of Egypt: “For this they will relinquish all amity with the world”

19 August 2014

Makarios of Egypt

“It is significant how deeply attracted men are by the spectacle of an earthly king and how eagerly they seek after it; and how everyone who lives in a city where the king has his residence longs to catch a glimpse simply of the extravagance and ostentation of his entourage. Only under the influence of spiritual things will they disregard all this and look down on it, wounded by another beauty and desiring a different kind of glory. If the sight of a mortal king is so important to worldly people, how much more desirable must the sight of the immortal king be to those into whom some drops of the Holy Spirit have fallen and whose hearts have been smitten by divine love? For this they will relinquish all amity with the world, so that they may keep that longing continually in their hearts, preferring nothing to it.”

– St. Makarios of Egypt

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