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Something to consider in the wake of Hurricane Sandy; an excerpt from Will & Ariel Durant

31 October 2012

“At any moment a comet may come too close to the earth and set our little globe turning topsy-turvy in a hectic course, or choke its men and fleas with fumes or heat; or a fragment of the smiling sun may slip off tangentially — as some think our planet did a few astronomic moments ago–and fall upon us in a wild embrace ending all grief and pain. We accept these possibilities in our stride, and retort to the cosmos in the words of Pascal: ‘When the universe has crushed him man will still be nobler than that which kills him, because he knows that he is dying, and of its victory the universe knows nothing.’

History is subject to geology. Every day the sea encroaches somewhere upon the land, or the land upon the sea; cities disappear under the water, and sunken cathedrals ring their melancholy bells. Mountains rise and fall in the rhythm of emergence and erosion; rivers swell and flood, or dry up, or change their course; valleys become deserts, and isthmuses becomes straits. To the geologic eye all the surface of the earth is a fluid form, and man moves upon it as insecurely as Peter walking on the waves to Christ.” 

Will & Ariel Durant, in Lessons of History

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One Comment leave one →
  1. Jocelyn permalink
    25 November 2012 11:55 pm

    Youre not the average weblog writer, man. You absolutely have some thing effective to add to the web. Such a great blog. Ill be back for more.

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